Browsed by
Tag: career

blockchain related career

blockchain related career

A pleasant call

A few months ago I was approached by the wonderful guys and girls from the Exosphere Academy with the offer to help them build a new blockahin course. They wanted to create a boot camp for people who are interested in blockchain, its implications and possible implementations. I liked the idea. For some time now I believed that one of the major obstacles for bitcoin, ethereum and other blockchain utilities to achieve their potential lies at the high learning curve new users and developers needs to climb. In this blog, and in other forums, I did my best to try and mitigate this learning curve and I was honored by the opportunity to construct a complete and cohesive course for other developers and enthusiasts.

 

My way.

After I took upon myself the task of creating this course, I was approached by a Brazilian magazine who asked me to describe how I became a blockchain developer. The result was the following article at carreirasolo.org. (The original article is in Portuguese). And right here is an English translation for all of those who’re interested in blockchain related carer.


 

The first time I heard about bitcoin.

Six years ago, I read a short article in a financial magazine about a new type of digital coin called bitcoin. Naturally, the article was completely misleading, which isn’t that surprising. At the time, nobody really understood bitcoin. I’m not even sure the article mentioned the word “blockchain”. But I will always remember this article and how I just skimmed it and completely disregarded the idea as just another scam – thus forfeiting my chance to become a millionaire by downloading a piece of software to my computer. A few years later, in 2012, when I was (slightly) older and wiser, I read another article about bitcoin, this time in a tech magazine. Although it wasn’t completely accurate, the article provided a great service to its audience. The reporter was not only informed about bitcoin, but he also put a lot of effort work into understanding his readers – their technical background and how well informed they were about economics, web architecture, computer science, etc. The result was the first ever bitcoin article I read that dealt with it in terms, analogies and examples that conveyed the actual ideas behind the coin.

After that, I was hooked. The protocol’s promise is one of the most ambitious projects I’ve ever encountered in the digital world. It’s not just another cool app, video game or social network where we can show off pictures to our friends and family. Bitcoin challenges us to literally rethink, remodel and rebuild some of the most central elements of human society – from financial systems, government bodies, bureaucracies, health care, sources of information and much more. All of these can benefit from implementing at least some of the tools presented in the bitcoin protocol. I knew that I wanted to be a part of it.

Baby steps

Initially, I didn’t have much coding experience. At the time I was finalizing my BSC in chemistry and environmental studies. I wrote some very basic Java code to help me in my work, but nothing more than that, so I knew I had to work on my coding skills – sooner rather than later. I decided to study Python for many reasons: it was easy to use, well documented, and already had a (relatively) large selection of bitcoin-related libraries and implementations. I was actually amazed at how well it went. Python turned out to be an extremely easy language to learn, but what was even more encouraging was that while learning the basic concepts of the programing language, I also gained many valuable insights into computer architecture and protocols. All this was very useful when I tried to figure out how Bitcoin worked.

After I felt reasonably competent with Python, I decided to look more into app development. Luckily, at the time, many JavaScript bitcoin-related libraries started to appear. JavaScript was easy enough to learn (especially when all you care about is the bitcoin part, and not the user experience). HTML and CSS were somewhat more confusing, but I soon managed to create some decent-looking interfaces for my bitcoin apps.

During this time, I was constantly reading bitcoin-related news stories, articles, blogs and forums, almost daily. This also provided me with a great feedback loop, as it always helped me focus on the spects of the programming language I was working with (Python and JavaScript).

Introducing ethereum

By the time Vitalik Buterin – who, by the way, was already highly respected In the bitcoin community – introduced his vision for Ethereum, I was already head over heels into Bitcoin and blockchains. I found the approach presented by Vitalik very compelling and promising, and I discovered that by learning how Ethereum works, I could enhance my own understanding of the bitcoin protocol by comparing the similarities and differences between the two.

The big leap

Meanwhile, I started to work on my Master’s degree and took few more advanced courses in algorithms and machine learning to amp up my computer skills. But I wasn’t pleased with the courses. The level at which we learned was high, no doubt about that, but none of the courses offered me any truly useful tools to work with. So I started to study by myself again.

I looked into assembly code, which helped me a lot in my understanding of the Ethereum Virtual Machine (or EVM for short). At this time, I decided to take a leap of faith and turn my passion to blockchains into a full-time career. At first, I started by creating simple videos that explained the basics of bitcoin. Then I showed some implementations for key features using Python. The initial exposure I received was very modest – but it did the job, and almost immediately I started to receive calls from professionals from a variety of industries who asked for my help and advice. Many of them wanted to use the power of bitcoin and the blockchain in their respective industries, and I was thrilled to be at the epicenter of such a great revolution in so many different and unique fields. Many of the people I worked with were genuinely looking for ways to revise their services and models to accommodate the needs of the 21st century. Many have the potential to empower millions (if not billions) of people in developing countries that might finally get direct access to many of the services we take for granted, like banking, medical insurance, pensions, legal frameworks to settle disputes, transparent government … the list goes on and on.

In the meanwhile

Blockchain architecture and computer decentralization is really not the scary thing most people think it is. The protocols are quite well documented, and once you’ve made some mental leaps, it will all start to make sense. You just need to learn it in steps. First, you need to understand what really sets blockchains apart from many other solutions. Then, using some basic coding and IT skills, you can easily familiarize yourself with many of its features and inner workings. The next step is to create some basic code that mimics a few of the more common blockchain-related features. Finally, putting it all together, you can start to create your own blockchain applications and decentralized solutions.

I’m biased. I’m in love with the vision that Bitcoin, Ethereum and blockchain architecture bring to the world. My fingers itch, and my appetite is insatiable. For years I’ve been working diligently to see this revolution spread from the computer geeks and mathematicians to the masses, where it’s really needed. So you’d better take my enthusiasm with a pinch of salt and look for the many blockchain-related projects that will now start to grow – and watch how they’re planning to literally change our world. Then you’ll feel the same way I do. I’m sure of it!